Dating methods in archaeology

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Archaeology dating techniques can assure buyers that their item is not a fake by providing scientific reassurance of the artefact's likely age.

Archaeological scientists have two primary ways of telling the age of artefacts and the sites from which they came: relative dating and absolute dating.

This method includes carbon dating and thermoluminescence.Based on a discipline of geology called stratigraphy, rock layers are used to decipher the sequence of historical geological events.Relative techniques can determine the sequence of events but not the precise date of an event, making these methods unreliable.The style of the artefact and its archaeology location stratigraphically are required to arrive at a relative date.For example, if an artefact, say an oil lamp, is found co-located on the same floor of a governor's dwelling, and that floor can be dated in archaeology terms by reason of the patterns employed in the mosaic, then it is assumed that in relation to the floor that the lamp is of the same age.

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